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Burns

Robert Burns

Ellisland Farm near Dumfries, the entrance to the farm

Period:
20th Century
Description:

This photograph was part of the first group of images of locations associated with Robert Burns to be made specifically for website use. It was taken using a 'conventional' SLR camera (not digital) on 35mm colour transparency film. The film was then sent to a photolab for processing; on its return the frames to be used were selected and these were sent back to the photolab for digitisation. They were written to a Photo CD Portfolio II disk as .pcd files, which was then passed to the Scottish Cultural Resources Access Network for uploading to their website. In all the images moved through the postal system five times.

 

This is an image of the entrance to Ellisland Farm. Robert Burns took on the lease of Ellisland Farm from Patrick Miller of Dalswinton from Whitsunday 1788 for a rent of £50 per year. It was a small unimproved holding of 170 acres situated on the bank of the River Nith about 5 miles north of the town of Dumfries. Miller gave Burns £300 with which to build a farm house and enclose the fields.

 

In January 1790 Burns wrote to his brother Gilbert, "it is a ruinous affair ... let it go to hell". By this time his career in the Excise was becoming established, and he finally quit the farm at the end of 1791, selling off his farming stock by public roup, or auction.

 

The five bedroomed farmhouse which was built to Burns' instructions was designed by Thomas Boyd, a Dumfries architect. It is still as it was in Burns' time, although the steadings have been much remodelled. In 1929 the farm was presented to the nation by John Wilson Williamson. It is now a museum.

Materials/Media:
35mm colour transparency
Source:
Dumfries Museum & Camera Obscura
Accession number:
CT35.99.67.18
Digital Number:
DMBN147n
Creation Date:
1999
Copyright:
Dumfries & Galloway Council